Find #timetoread with these five picture books

Today sees the launch of BookTrust’s National Time to Read Challenge.

The literacy charity is asking families to find ten minutes each day during 18-22 September to read together. The campaign is aimed at 4 to 10-year-olds and their parents are encouraged to share a book with their child, even if they are big enough to read to themselves.

It’s because reading isn’t just an important life skill – it’s a time to bond, talk about the day and spark their imagination.

We obviously love a bedtime (or any time) story in our house and its been touching to see Baby Bookworm grow to enjoy it. Earlier this week he started saying the word ‘George’ when we read Oh No, George! by Chris Haughton – and yesterday he picked it off the shelf himself and said it again.

It shows the impact our story sessions have.

While #timetoread is for school age children, we will still be taking part for the next five evenings. It’s never too soon to share a book with a child.

Here are five books that we are taking pleasure from at the moment, to give you a little inspiration…

The Bumblebear by Nadia Shireen. £6.99 (paperback), Penguin

Norman the bear loves honey more than anything so disguises himself as a bee to try and get a taste. But it turns out he makes a pretty good bee and the other pupils at bee school love him – until the discover his cunning plot. Charming and funny, this is a truly sweet story about friendship that every reception aged child in England will be receiving very soon as part of the #timetoread campaign. Praise indeed!

Try these Bumblebear-themed activities from BookTrust

Watch Nadia read The Bumblebear

Rapunzel by Bethan Woollvin. £11.99 (hardback), Two Hoots

This classic character turns kick-ass in this cool new version by the award-winning author-illustrator. No waiting around to be rescued by Prince Charming – this 21st Century flaxen-haired maiden takes on the witch with her own cunning and rides off into the sunset with a superhero cape and a natty new haircut to boot. We adore the eye-catching three colour palette of black, white and yellow, too.


Mr Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown. £6.99 (paperback), Two Hoots

This stunningly illustrated story takes the children’s book staple of anthropormorphised animals and turns the idea of its head. What would happen if a suit-wearing, city dwelling, talking tiger decided to go back to his roots? A clever concept, brilliantly executed – and Mr Tiger’s expressions are just joyous.

The Incredible Book Eating Boy by Oliver Jeffers. £6.99 (paperback), HarperCollins Children’s

An ode to the joy of books that is also a joy to look at, thanks to Oliver’s unique artwork, all done on images of old book jackets and pages. The story’s hero Henry starts chomping on his library books and finds he not only loves the taste, but swallowing stories makes him smarter too. As a child who was always told I’d swallowed a dictionary, this book never fails to raise a wry smile from me.


Daddy Long Legs by Nadine Brun-Cosme and Aurelie Guillerey. £11.99 (hardback), Two Hoots

A delightful tale about a parent’s fierce and limitless love for their child, told with humour, fantastical scenarios and charming illustrations. Anxious Matty is worried how his father will collect him from nursery if the old green car doesn’t start but his devoted daddy explains all the weird and wonderful ways he’ll reach him, involving dragons, tractors and some seriously long legs.


Find out what children’s authors like Michael Rosen and Lauren Child chose as their most gripping ten-minute reads

 

 

 

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